About Event

event
03Nov
Registration

Fees

Register
2016:11:03 08:00:00 2016:11:03 08:00:00 Asia/Ho_Chi_Minh The Economist Events – Vietnam Summit 2016 Date: November 3rd 2016, Ho Chi Minh City, VietnamTime: 8:00am – 5:45pm Place: InterContinental Asiana Saigon, Corner Hai Ba Trung , St. Le Duan Bl, District 1 : Ho Chi Minh City, VietnamFee: British Business Group Vietnam: Special Partner rate USD 1,440, Group tickets purchase of three or more USD 1,260 Details: The Vietnam Summit 2016 will bring together leading voices from government, business and finance, civil society and academia for a forthright discussion about the opportunities and challenges facing Vietnam. Is it smooth sailing ahead?Read The Economist article "America and Vietnam: Pull the other one".Click to follow us on Facebook and join online discussion by using hashtag #EconVT. Registration: http://bit.ly/2cedAvcBritish Business Group Vietnam’s memebers are entitled to 20% off the standard ticket price.Event website: vietnam.economist.com More Information:Growth in emerging markets may be slowing, but Vietnam’s economy is going strong. The Economist Intelligence Unit expects Vietnam’s real GDP to grow by 6.8% in 2016, and growth should be even higher in 2017. Vietnam is exposed to a slowdown in China, but stands to benefit from structural shifts in its northern neighbour’s economy as higher wages drive low-cost manufacturing across the border. Vietnam’s job-intensive manufacturing and garment sectors are also expected to benefit from the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Also on the table are trade deals such as the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership, which includes China, and the European Union trade deal. The ruling Communist Party’s 12th five-yearly national congress, held in January 2016, returned Nguyen Phu Trong as general secretary. This suggests the policy environment will remain stable. But domestic politics may yet cause headaches. Despite an anti-graft campaign, Vietnam remains one of the most corrupt countries in the world. Protests over any of these issues could endanger the country’s domestic harmony. InterContinental Asiana Saigon, Corner Hai Ba Trung , St.& Le Duan Bl, District 1 : Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

The Economist Events – Vietnam Summit 2016

Time

Location

InterContinental Asiana Saigon, Corner Hai Ba Trung , St.& Le Duan Bl, District 1 : Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Category

Supported Events

Event details

Vietnam2016_633x335_cta.png

 

Date:     November 3rd 2016, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Time:     8:00am – 5:45pm
Place:    InterContinental Asiana Saigon, Corner Hai Ba Trung , St.& Le Duan Bl, District 1 : Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Fee:    British Business Group Vietnam: Special Partner rate USD 1,440, Group tickets purchase of three or more USD 1,260


Details: The Vietnam Summit 2016 will bring together leading voices from government, business and finance, civil society and academia for a forthright discussion about the opportunities and challenges facing Vietnam. Is it smooth sailing ahead?
Read The Economist article "America and Vietnam: Pull the other one".
Click to follow us on Facebook and join online discussion by using hashtag #EconVT.

 

Registration: http://bit.ly/2cedAvc
British Business Group Vietnam’s memebers are entitled to 20% off the standard ticket price.
Event website: vietnam.economist.com

 

More Information:
Growth in emerging markets may be slowing, but Vietnam’s economy is going strong. The Economist Intelligence Unit expects Vietnam’s real GDP to grow by 6.8% in 2016, and growth should be even higher in 2017. Vietnam is exposed to a slowdown in China, but stands to benefit from structural shifts in its northern neighbour’s economy as higher wages drive low-cost manufacturing across the border. Vietnam’s job-intensive manufacturing and garment sectors are also expected to benefit from the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Also on the table are trade deals such as the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership, which includes China, and the European Union trade deal.

 

The ruling Communist Party’s 12th five-yearly national congress, held in January 2016, returned Nguyen Phu Trong as general secretary. This suggests the policy environment will remain stable. But domestic politics may yet cause headaches. Despite an anti-graft campaign, Vietnam remains one of the most corrupt countries in the world. Protests over any of these issues could endanger the country’s domestic harmony.


  • Want to see other events? Click here
  • Want to learn more about the BBGV? Click here
  • Want to become BBGV member? See members benefits
Summary rating:   
0 out of 5 stars